Crunch-Topped Apple Coffee Cake

Crunch-Topped Apple Coffee CakeA few months ago, I volunteered to bring baked goods for the local cycling coalition’s monthly Bike to Work breakfast, as is my wont. I decided that I was in the mood for coffee cake, but I couldn’t find a single recipe that encompassed everything I wanted: a crunchy, crumbly topping, with a moist, fruity, not too sugary interior, all in a tender cake that would cut into nice pieces for eating without utensils.

This is what I cobbled together; I’ve made it three times now, and it’s been a big success every time. In fact, I might just argue that this is my platonic coffee cake. So while it does involve a “mise en place” approach of preparing several different components, then combining them, I think the results are worth it. Enjoy!


Crunch-Topped Apple Coffee Cake
(makes 32 smallish pieces)

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Will I look back and laugh at how much I did, or how little?

I thought it might be helpful for people who’re wondering why I never talk to them any more to see what I’ve been doing this semester. 🙂 Um, and if you’re one of those people, I’m truly sorry.

The relationship between the links and their subject is left as an exercise for the reader.

Classes:
Environmental Theologies
Religion in American Society, 1550-1870
Principles and Practice of Preaching
Introductory Greek
Practicuum (discussion and support of structured church internship)
New Testament Interpretation (auditing*)

Work:
Internship with a local “evangelical, ecumenical, Episcopalian” church
Intern for the City for the Transportation department, working on projects of sustainable transit

Extracurricular:
Yale Earth Care Committee (apparently I’m the technical president . . .)
Elm City Cycling (committee member, city liason, and baked-goods-maker)
Committee member for the Org. for Transformative Works
Monday night WoD RPG
Berkeley Divinity School

So, yeah. When I’ve gotten to the point of telling the boyfriend, “how about I just give you access to my Google Calendar, so you know when I’ll be free, since I’ve got eight things lined up for every day already” . . . I know I’m busy.

(* – I like the NT lecturer, and I really need the background, but I didn’t have the space for the class this year. And frankly, I’m much more interested in refreshing a general background for academic exploration of the NT texts, so I can take upper-level seminars in NT next year, than I am in memorizing dates and writing entry-level essays. So this way, I get to attend lectures without having to do the boring work. Yay!)

I hate summary posts.

Things I did this weekend:

  • Made crème brulée with a real propane blowtorch (mmm, fire. mmm, burn-sugar crust that crackles when you pierce it with a spoon.).
  • Made crisp, melt-delicately-on-your-tongue meringues that tasted almost as good as my aunt’s, even if they didn’t look quite as pretty.
  • Made real, delicious, non-mushy Spanish rice from scratch, and chicken seared in a cast-iron skillet and simmered in a kicked-up enchilada sauce.
  • Carried the bishop’s crosier before her during a high Mass.
  • Read a chapter of Greek, and remembered why I didn’t want to take it.
  • Watched a couple of episodes of Batman: TAS, and remembered why it’s such an amazingly good show.
  • Started to plan for my First Sermon Evar.
  • Bought pseudo-eco-friendly food and felt guilty as an environmentalist.
  • Discovered (and sang at a hymnsing!) “There Is a Fountain Filled with Blood,” which is the most cheerfully gruesome and morbid hymn I’ve ever heard.
  • Chastised myself for falling behind on my journal, then tried to write this entry twice before and had it deleted twice. Dammit.

At some point I’ll write up a summary of my courseload and commitments for this semester. Too busy for that now.

I saw Eternity the other night.

When my father died when I was seventeen, I pondered heaven and God’s plan for el’s complex and contradictory children, and it seemed to me evident that nobody I know, certainly including myself, was ready for heaven after this mortal life in which we are all, one way or another, bent and broken. There may be a handful of people who are prepared for the unveiled vision of God. But most of us are not, most of us still have a vast amount to learn. I don’t know how God plans to teach me all that I need to know before I am ready for the Glory, but my faith is based on the belief that I don’t have to know. I have to know only that the Maker is not going to abandon me when I die, is not going to make creatures who are able to ask questions which simply cannot be answered in this life, and then drop them with the questions still unanswered.

A Stone for a Pillow, by Madeline L’Engle